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Rescue: True Stories of the U.S. Life-Saving Service

We’ve just released our second compendium of the best of Wreck & Rescue JournalRescue: True Stories of the U.S. Life-Saving Service, published by Avery Color Studios.

Rescue features original articles by the country’s leading experts in the field of search and rescue history: Fred Stonehouse, Dennis L. Noble, John Galluzzo and many more. In all, seventeen contributors helped create this celebration of the history of the United States Life-Saving Service. 

 

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1897 Long Branch Boathouse Destroyed by Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy destroyed the last remaining historic U.S. Life-Saving Service building that remained on site on October 29th 2012. The 1897 Boathouse was reduced to a pile rubble after hurricane force winds and storm surge took the building down. In May of 2012 after years of speculation and controversy, the 1876 and the 1903 Port Huron Style Stations were moved to private property of the developer Douglas Jemal at 900 Ocean Avenue. If the buildings would not have been moved in May, they most likely would have not survived the storm. The 1876 building is being used as a pool house and plans are not set yet for the Port Huron style station as reported in various media outlets.Please see our endangered stations page for information about other threatened stations. At this time, all other stations have survived the storm structurally. Some have had minor flooding and sand encased around them, but are still standing.

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Ocean City NJ Open House Set

Ocean City NJ Open House Set

Join members of the Saving Our Station (SOS) Coalition from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 13, 2010, to tour this important historic site.

The purpose of this open house is to help to find buyers for the circa 1885 Station by raising awareness of its availability.

The SOS Coalition successfully negotiated with the property owner to allow us to market the property at its value as an historic property of $887,500.  A deed has been prepared and is being held by a third party waiting for a buyer to step forward with the agreed amount. 

 

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Ocean City, NJ USLSS For Sale

Ocean City, NJ USLSS For Sale

A SEASHORE LANDMARK’S LAST BEST HOPE

A recent agreement by Saving Our Station (S.O.S.), a southern New Jersey historic-preservation coalition, with Ocean City Life-Saving Station owners Rafaele Pansini and Roger Parkin and with city government, opens up a rare and unparalleled opportunity for a preservation-minded buyer to acquire the station property for $887,500.

“This is a very reasonable price,” says S.O.S. president Charles London.  “The Coalition, with the help of our attorney Clem Lisitski, has fought hard for more than a decade to save this incredibly historic landmark on its original site.  This agreement is the best chance yet for us to reach that goal.”

The agreement, announced by New Jersey Superior Court Judge Daryl F. Todd on November 4, 2009, results from earlier court mandates requiring the owners of the station property to sell it at a historic-preservation price.  Judge Todd’s announcement is responsive to S.O.S. concerns that after those mandates, the owners’ marketing efforts were not active enough and were based on an imprecise appraisal which had resulted in a price over $1,000,000.  The $887,500 price was agreed upon because it reflects the appropriate price for this historic property.

“We battled for nearly 12 years to have the station listed at the proper historic-preservation price.” notes S.O.S. president London.  “This agreement is a welcome outcome of our struggles.  And keep in mind that it was lack of a preservation price which led to a $3.1 million price tag being put on the property when public acquisition of it was considered and defeated.”

The November 4 agreement, in addition to providing for a more active marketing role for S.O.S., also provides for transparency regarding any real-estate transactions involved.  The agreement specifies that a prospective buyer present the $887,500 amount through retired judge George T. Seltzer, court-appointed escrow agent and holder of the station property’s deed.

Time is of the essence with this agreement, so S.O.S. is advising prospective buyers to act quickly.  The agreement is in effect for six months.  If the sale is not finalized by May 14, 2010, the deed reverts to the owners of the property, which could well mean demolition of the life-saving station and its replacement by several condominium units.

“While the November 4 agreement is our best hope so far,” concludes London, “it could be our last hope.  We believe, however, that the right preservation buyer will come forward.  Not only is the 1885-86 Ocean City Life-Saving Station rich in history, having been U.S. Life-Saving Station #30 for 30 years and U.S. Coast Guard Station #126 for 20 years after that, but it is structurally sound, architecturally distinctive, and visually beautiful.  It is located in Ocean City’s historic district and is eligible for listing on national and state historic registers.  Depending on the buyer, it may qualify for sources of restoration assistance.  All in all, it has tremendous potential for becoming a showplace of the unique seashore heritage of its city, region, state, and nation.”

To find out how you can purchase the Ocean City Life-Saving Station, 4th Street and Atlantic Avenue, Ocean City, NJ, contact Charlie London, (609) 742-1190 soscoalition@aol.com.  For legal questions regarding the Station, contact Clem Lisitski, (609) 398-6100.  The coalition is a nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization.
Save Our Station Coalition
P.O.Box 318, Ocean City, NJ 08226

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Ocean City, NJ USLSS For Sale

A SEASHORE LANDMARK’S LAST BEST HOPE

A recent agreement by Saving Our Station (S.O.S.), a southern New Jersey historic-preservation coalition, with Ocean City Life-Saving Station owners Rafaele Pansini and Roger Parkin and with city government, opens up a rare and unparalleled opportunity for a preservation-minded buyer to acquire the station property for $887,500.

“This is a very reasonable price,” says S.O.S. president Charles London.  “The Coalition, with the help of our attorney Clem Lisitski, has fought hard for more than a decade to save this incredibly historic landmark on its original site.  This agreement is the best chance yet for us to reach that goal.”

The agreement, announced by New Jersey Superior Court Judge Daryl F. Todd on November 4, 2009, results from earlier court mandates requiring the owners of the station property to sell it at a historic-preservation price.  Judge Todd’s announcement is responsive to S.O.S. concerns that after those mandates, the owners’ marketing efforts were not active enough and were based on an imprecise appraisal which had resulted in a price over $1,000,000.  The $887,500 price was agreed upon because it reflects the appropriate price for this historic property.

“We battled for nearly 12 years to have the station listed at the proper historic-preservation price.” notes S.O.S. president London.  “This agreement is a welcome outcome of our struggles.  And keep in mind that it was lack of a preservation price which led to a $3.1 million price tag being put on the property when public acquisition of it was considered and defeated.”

The November 4 agreement, in addition to providing for a more active marketing role for S.O.S., also provides for transparency regarding any real-estate transactions involved.  The agreement specifies that a prospective buyer present the $887,500 amount through retired judge George T. Seltzer, court-appointed escrow agent and holder of the station property’s deed.

Time is of the essence with this agreement, so S.O.S. is advising prospective buyers to act quickly.  The agreement is in effect for six months.  If the sale is not finalized by May 14, 2010, the deed reverts to the owners of the property, which could well mean demolition of the life-saving station and its replacement by several condominium units.

“While the November 4 agreement is our best hope so far,” concludes London, “it could be our last hope.  We believe, however, that the right preservation buyer will come forward.  Not only is the 1885-86 Ocean City Life-Saving Station rich in history, having been U.S. Life-Saving Station #30 for 30 years and U.S. Coast Guard Station #126 for 20 years after that, but it is structurally sound, architecturally distinctive, and visually beautiful.  It is located in Ocean City’s historic district and is eligible for listing on national and state historic registers.  Depending on the buyer, it may qualify for sources of restoration assistance.  All in all, it has tremendous potential for becoming a showplace of the unique seashore heritage of its city, region, state, and nation.”

To find out how you can purchase the Ocean City Life-Saving Station, 4th Street and Atlantic Avenue, Ocean City, NJ, contact Charlie London, (609) 742-1190 soscoalition@aol.com.  For legal questions regarding the Station, contact Clem Lisitski, (609) 398-6100.  The coalition is a nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization.


Save Our Station Coalition
P.O.Box 318, Ocean City, NJ 08226

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Old Harbor Station Is Reminder Of Impermanence Of Beach Buildings

Cape Cod Chronicle

Sentinel, Relocated
Old Harbor Station Is Reminder Of Impermanence Of Beach Buildings
by Debra Lawless

The recent demolition of several North Beach camps is a reminder that the beach, and the structures that sit on it, are not permanent.  One of the most notable and historic structures to call the barrier beach home, the Old Harbor Lifesaving Station, was fortunate to find a new home once its useful life was over, and a new book by a Chatham native celebrates that life, both in Chatham and beyond….Read More….

 

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