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Wreck & Rescue Journal

Wreck & RescueThe United States Life-Saving Service Heritage Association has proudly published Wreck & Rescue Journal since 1996, showcasing the talent and historical acumen of the country’s greatest Coast Guard historians, not to mention those search and rescue historians working north of the border in Canada as well as overseas. Stories focus on the life and death struggles of shipwrecks, current preservation issues, historic lifesaving technology and historical parallels to the modern United States Coast Guard. In 2008, the association published its first “best of” Wreck & Rescue Journal book, They Had to Go Out. In 2011, we released Rescue: True Stories of the Life-Saving Service, our second edition of the best of Wreck & Rescue Journal.

They Had to Go Out

They Had To Go Out… represents an unprecedented gathering of talented historians working in the field of Coast Guard history from the pages of Wreck & Rescue Journal, including works by Dennis L. Noble, Frederick Stonehouse, Ralph Shanks, Maurice Gibbs and John Galluzzo. These stories, while representative of the service as a whole, reaching from Massachusetts to Michigan to Washington, cover but a small portion of the true-to-life stories of bravado and selflessness of the men of the U.S. Life-Saving Service, shedding light on perhaps the most exciting aspect of America’s maritime history.

Life Lines Newsletter

Life Lines is the preservation newsletter of the United States Life-Saving Service Heritage Association, focusing on brief items of interest from around the country and the world, highlighting the efforts of local people and organizations working to save Life-Saving Service and early Coast Guard architecture, artifacts and history. In the past, Life Lines has been mailed separately from Wreck & Rescue Journal, but will now be included in the newer, expanded magazine. View a few of our past Life Lines Newsletters to see what they are all about here.

USLSS Annual Reports

The United States Life-Saving Service, like all federal government institutions, was required to record annual reports for consumption by the public. But, due to the nature of their work, the reports read more like adventure novels than government reports. The reports have been digitized and are available for reading on the internet. Please click here to view these reports on-line under our educational and resource section.